Butte Silver Bow Public Library

Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Coming home: a special issue devoted to the historic built environment & landscapes of Butte and Anaconda, Montana / Patty Dean, guest editor.

By: Dean, Patty.
Contributor(s): Drumlummon Institute | Montana Preservation Alliance.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Helena, Mont. : Drumlummon Institute, 2009ISBN: 0976968436; 9780976968436.Subject(s): Butte (Mont.) -- History | Anaconda (Mont.) -- History | Vernacular architecture -- Montana -- Butte -- History | Vernacular architecture -- Anaconda (Mont.) -- History | Nature -- Effect of human beings on -- Montana -- Butte -- History | Nature -- Effect of human beings on -- Anaconda (Mont.) -- History | Landscapes -- Montana -- Butte -- History | Landscapes -- Anaconda (Mont.) -- History | Copper mines and mining -- Montana -- Butte | Smelting -- Anaconda (Mont.)Summary: Perhaps the most scrutinized and documented of Montana cities, Butte and Anaconda possess great material and cultural incongruities that continue to intrigue and beguile: natural beauty versus industrial landscape, great wealth versus subsistence and poverty, ornate buildings designed by nationally known architects versus alley hovels, urban density versus the void of the Berkeley Pit. This special issue of Drumlummon Views seeks to shed fresh light on the industrial and domestic landscapes that make these cities so distinctive. The issue features essays, portfolios, and reprints that make accessible such underutilized/forgotten historic resources as an early 20th-century newspaper series profiling "queer spots" in and around Butte and Anaconda (e.g. Chinese gardens, the "Assyrian colony" on East Park, the Cree village on the Butte Flats), historic photographs of sanitary conditions in Butte's working class neighborhoods, and a 1907 article on arts and crafts homes in Butte. In addition, the issue offers new research on the landscape and architecture of Butte and Anaconda as a manifestation of dominance and power, multi-family building forms in Butte, Anaconda's roundhouse, and Butte's iconic mine headframes. The issue also includes works by visual artists, writers, and poets who reflect on, interpret, and document the landscapes and cultures that make these places so extraordinary.
List(s) this item appears in: Books on Butte | July-August - Butte Display
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Non-circulating Non-circulating Butte Public Library
STACKS
Special Montana Collection BUTTE 978.668 DEA (Browse shelf) Not for loan 2089100152578
Two-week, one renewal Butte Public Library
STACKS
Special Montana Collection BUTTE 978.668 DEA (Browse shelf) Available 2089100113851
Total holds: 0

Drumlummon Views Volume 3, No. 1 (2009)--t.p.

"A joint publication of the Montana Perservation Alliance & Drumlummon Institute." -- t.p.

Perhaps the most scrutinized and documented of Montana cities, Butte and Anaconda possess great material and cultural incongruities that continue to intrigue and beguile: natural beauty versus industrial landscape, great wealth versus subsistence and poverty, ornate buildings designed by nationally known architects versus alley hovels, urban density versus the void of the Berkeley Pit. This special issue of Drumlummon Views seeks to shed fresh light on the industrial and domestic landscapes that make these cities so distinctive. The issue features essays, portfolios, and reprints that make accessible such underutilized/forgotten historic resources as an early 20th-century newspaper series profiling "queer spots" in and around Butte and Anaconda (e.g. Chinese gardens, the "Assyrian colony" on East Park, the Cree village on the Butte Flats), historic photographs of sanitary conditions in Butte's working class neighborhoods, and a 1907 article on arts and crafts homes in Butte. In addition, the issue offers new research on the landscape and architecture of Butte and Anaconda as a manifestation of dominance and power, multi-family building forms in Butte, Anaconda's roundhouse, and Butte's iconic mine headframes. The issue also includes works by visual artists, writers, and poets who reflect on, interpret, and document the landscapes and cultures that make these places so extraordinary.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Celebrating Butte and Connecting our Community

Contact us: info@buttepubliclibrary.info or 406.723.3361

Powered by Koha