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American Sherlock : murder, forensics, and the birth of American CSI / Kate Winkler Dawson.

By: Dawson, Kate Winkler [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : G. P. Putnam's Sons, [2020]Description: 325 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780525539551; 0525539557.Subject(s): Heinrich, Edward Oscar, 1881-1953 | Criminologists -- United States -- Biography | Forensic sciences -- United States -- History | TRUE CRIME / Forensics | HISTORY / United States / 20th Century | SCIENCE / History | Forensic sciences | Forensic scientists | United States | Forensic scientists -- Biography | Forensic sciencesGenre/Form: History. | Biographies.Additional physical formats: Online version:: American SherlockDDC classification: 363.25092 | B
Contents:
Prologue: Tales from the archive: pistols, jawbones, and love poetry -- A bloody mess: the case of Allene Lamson's bath, part I -- Genius: the case of Oscar Heinrich's demons -- Heathen: the case of the Baker's handwriting, part I -- Pioneer: the case of the Baker's handwriting, part II -- Damnation: the case of the star's fingerprints, part I -- Indignation: the case of the star's fingerprints, part II -- Double 13: the case of the great train heist -- Bad chemistry: the case of the calculating chemist -- Bits and pieces: the case of Bessie Ferguson's ear -- Triggered: the case of Marty Colwell's gun -- Damned: the case of Allene lamson's Bath, part II.
Summary: "From the acclaimed author of Death in the Air ("Not since Devil in the White City has a book told such a harrowing tale"--Douglas Preston) comes the riveting story of the birth of criminal investigation in the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with beakers, microscopes, and hundreds upon hundreds of books sat Edward Oscar Heinrich, America's first forensic scientists. Working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. Dawson captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon-- as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them. -- adapted from jacket
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Two-week, one renewal Butte Public Library
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Nonfiction NEW 363.250 DAW (Browse shelf) Available 2089100156267
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Prologue: Tales from the archive: pistols, jawbones, and love poetry -- A bloody mess: the case of Allene Lamson's bath, part I -- Genius: the case of Oscar Heinrich's demons -- Heathen: the case of the Baker's handwriting, part I -- Pioneer: the case of the Baker's handwriting, part II -- Damnation: the case of the star's fingerprints, part I -- Indignation: the case of the star's fingerprints, part II -- Double 13: the case of the great train heist -- Bad chemistry: the case of the calculating chemist -- Bits and pieces: the case of Bessie Ferguson's ear -- Triggered: the case of Marty Colwell's gun -- Damned: the case of Allene lamson's Bath, part II.

"From the acclaimed author of Death in the Air ("Not since Devil in the White City has a book told such a harrowing tale"--Douglas Preston) comes the riveting story of the birth of criminal investigation in the twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.

Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with beakers, microscopes, and hundreds upon hundreds of books sat Edward Oscar Heinrich, America's first forensic scientists. Working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. Dawson captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon-- as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them. -- adapted from jacket

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