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The great influenza : the epic story of the deadliest plague in history / John M. Barry.

By: Barry, John M, 1947-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Viking, �2004Description: 546 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0670894737; 9780670894734; 096591142X; 9780965911429; 0143036491; 9780143036494.Subject(s): Influenza Epidemic (1918-1919) | Umschulungswerkst�atten f�ur Siedler und Auswanderer Bitterfeld | Influenza Epidemic, 1918-1919 | Influenza Epidemic, 1918-1919 -- United States | Medicine -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Influenza Epidemic, 1918-1919 | Influenza, Human -- history | Disease Outbreaks -- history | History, 20th Century | United States | Grippe -- Histoire -- 20e si�ecle | Medicine | United States | Influenza | Epidemie�en | Grippe | Geschichte 1918 | USA | Influenza -- History | 1900-1999Genre/Form: History.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Great influenza.DDC classification: 614.5/18/09041 Other classification: 44.75 | 8 Online resources: Sample text | Table of contents | Contributor biographical information | Publisher description
Contents:
The warriors -- The swarm -- The tinderbox -- It begins -- Explosion -- The pestilence -- The race -- The tolling of the bell -- Lingerer -- Endgame.
Review: "In the winter of 1918, the coldest the American Midwest had ever endured, history's most lethal influenza virus was born. Over the next year it flourished, killing as many as 100 million people. It killed more people in twenty-four weeks than AIDS has killed in twenty-four years, more people in a year than the Black Death of the Middle Ages killed in a century. There were many echoes of the Middle Ages in 1918: victims turned blue-black and priests in some of the world's most modern cities drove horse-drawn carts down the streets, calling upon people to bring out their dead." "But 1918 was not the Middle Ages, and the story of this epidemic is not simply one of death, suffering, and terror; it is the story of one war imposed upon the background of another. For the first time in history, science collided with epidemic disease, and great scientists - pioneers who defined modern American medicine - pitted themselves against a pestilence. The politicians and military commanders of World War I, focusing upon a different type of enemy, ignored warnings from these scientists and so fostered conditions that helped the virus kill. The strain of these two wars put society itself under almost unimaginable pressure. Even as scientists began to make progress, the larger society around them began to crack." "Yet ultimately this is a story of triumph amidst tragedy, illuminating human courage as well as science. In particular, this courage led a tenacious investigator directly to one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the twentieth century - a discovery that has spawned many Nobel prizes and even now is shaping our future."--Jacket.
List(s) this item appears in: Plague and Pandemic March 20
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Nonfiction 614.5 BAR (Browse shelf) Available 2089100154443
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 507-527) and index.

The warriors -- The swarm -- The tinderbox -- It begins -- Explosion -- The pestilence -- The race -- The tolling of the bell -- Lingerer -- Endgame.

"In the winter of 1918, the coldest the American Midwest had ever endured, history's most lethal influenza virus was born. Over the next year it flourished, killing as many as 100 million people. It killed more people in twenty-four weeks than AIDS has killed in twenty-four years, more people in a year than the Black Death of the Middle Ages killed in a century. There were many echoes of the Middle Ages in 1918: victims turned blue-black and priests in some of the world's most modern cities drove horse-drawn carts down the streets, calling upon people to bring out their dead." "But 1918 was not the Middle Ages, and the story of this epidemic is not simply one of death, suffering, and terror; it is the story of one war imposed upon the background of another. For the first time in history, science collided with epidemic disease, and great scientists - pioneers who defined modern American medicine - pitted themselves against a pestilence. The politicians and military commanders of World War I, focusing upon a different type of enemy, ignored warnings from these scientists and so fostered conditions that helped the virus kill. The strain of these two wars put society itself under almost unimaginable pressure. Even as scientists began to make progress, the larger society around them began to crack." "Yet ultimately this is a story of triumph amidst tragedy, illuminating human courage as well as science. In particular, this courage led a tenacious investigator directly to one of the greatest scientific discoveries of the twentieth century - a discovery that has spawned many Nobel prizes and even now is shaping our future."--Jacket.

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Other editions of this work

The great influenza : by Barry, John M., ©2004
The great influenza : by Barry, John M., ©2005
The great influenza : by Barry, John M., ©2004

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