Butte Silver Bow Public Library

Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Dew of death : the story of lewisite, America's World War I weapon of mass destruction / Joel A. Vilensky ; with the assistance of Pandy R. Sinish ; foreword by Richard Butler.

By: Vilensky, Joel A, 1951-.
Contributor(s): Sinish, Pandy R.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, �2005Description: xxiii, 213 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0253346126; 9780253346124.Subject(s): Lewisite (Poison gas) -- History | Organoarsenic compounds -- Toxicology | Chemical Warfare Agents -- history | Gas Poisoning -- history | Lewisite (Poison gas) | Organoarsenic compounds -- Toxicology | Lewisit Giftgas | Weltkrieg 1914-1918 | USA | USAGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 358/.3482 Other classification: NP 4410 | 8 Online resources: ebrary | Table of contents | Table of contents
Contents:
1878: two stars are born -- The poisonous yellow cloud and the American response -- The hunt for a new king -- The American university experimental station -- Willoughby -- The inter-war years -- Military biology and BAL -- World war II -- Lewisite production, use, and sea dumping after World War II -- Lewisite stockpiles and terrestrial residues -- Human and environmental toxicology -- Lewisite, terrorism, and the future.
Summary: Annotation A timely, riveting history of America's World War I project to develop a deadly chemical weapon.Summary: Annotation In 1919, when the Great War was over, the New York Times reported on a new chemical weapon with "the fragrance of geranium blossoms, "a poison gas that was "the climax of this country's achievements in the lethal arts."The name of this substance was lewisite and this is its story-the story of an American weapon of mass destruction. Discovered by accident by a graduate student and priest in a chemistry laboratory at American University, lewisite was developed into a weapon by Winford Lewis, who became its namesake. After a powerful German counterattack in the spring of 1918, the government began frantic production of lewisite in hopes of delivering 3,000 tons of the stuff to be ready for use in Europe the following year. The end of war came just as the first shipment was being prepared. It was dumped into the sea, but not forgotten. Joel A. Vilensky tells the intriguing story of the discovery and development of this weapon and its curious history.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Four-week, one renewal Four-week, one renewal Butte Public Library
STACKS
Nonfiction 358.2 VIL (Browse shelf) Available 2089100148199
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 188-209) and index.

1878: two stars are born -- The poisonous yellow cloud and the American response -- The hunt for a new king -- The American university experimental station -- Willoughby -- The inter-war years -- Military biology and BAL -- World war II -- Lewisite production, use, and sea dumping after World War II -- Lewisite stockpiles and terrestrial residues -- Human and environmental toxicology -- Lewisite, terrorism, and the future.

Annotation A timely, riveting history of America's World War I project to develop a deadly chemical weapon.

Annotation In 1919, when the Great War was over, the New York Times reported on a new chemical weapon with "the fragrance of geranium blossoms, "a poison gas that was "the climax of this country's achievements in the lethal arts."The name of this substance was lewisite and this is its story-the story of an American weapon of mass destruction. Discovered by accident by a graduate student and priest in a chemistry laboratory at American University, lewisite was developed into a weapon by Winford Lewis, who became its namesake. After a powerful German counterattack in the spring of 1918, the government began frantic production of lewisite in hopes of delivering 3,000 tons of the stuff to be ready for use in Europe the following year. The end of war came just as the first shipment was being prepared. It was dumped into the sea, but not forgotten. Joel A. Vilensky tells the intriguing story of the discovery and development of this weapon and its curious history.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Celebrating Butte and Connecting our Community

Contact us: info@buttepubliclibrary.info or 406.723.3361

Powered by Koha