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The evolution underground : burrows, bunkers, and the marvelous subterranean world beneath our feet / Anthony J. Martin.

By: Martin, Anthony J, 1960- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York ; London : Pegasus Books, 2017Copyright date: �2017Edition: First Pegasus Books cloth edition.Description: 405 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : color illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781681773124; 1681773120; 9781681776569; 1681776561.Subject(s): Trace fossils | Civilization, Subterranean | Underground areas | Burrowing animals, Fossil | Animal burrowing | Soil animals | Cave dwellers | Footprints, Fossil | Ichnology | NATURE -- Animals -- Dinosaurs & Prehistoric Creatures | NATURE -- Ecosystems & Habitats | SCIENCE -- Life Sciences -- Evolution | SCIENCE -- Paleontology | Animal burrowing | Burrowing animals, Fossil | Cave dwellers | Civilization, Subterranean | Footprints, Fossil | Ichnology | Soil animals | Trace fossils | Underground areas | Fossils | Prehistoric animals | Animal burrowing | Soil animals | Cave dwellers | Ichnology | Bodentiere | Fossile Tiere | Unterirdische Welt | Boden�okologie | H�ohle | H�ohlentiere | Ichnologie | Mensch | �Okosystem | Unterirdisches BauwerkGenre/Form: Nonfiction.DDC classification: 560/.43 Other classification: 591.5648
Contents:
The wondrous world of burrows -- Beyond "cavemen" : a brief history of humans underground -- Kaleidoscopes of dug-out diversity -- Hadean dinosaurs and birds underfoot -- Bomb shelters of the Phanerozoic -- Terraforming a planet, one hole at a time -- Playing hide and seek for keeps -- Rulers of the underworld -- Viva la evoluci�on : change comes from within -- Appendix: Genera and species mentioned in The evolution underground.
Summary: "What is the best way to survive when the going gets tough? From dinosaurs to penguins, from trilobites to humans, discover the marvelous subterranean secret to survival. Humans have "gone underground" for survival for thousands of years, whether in ancient underground cities or Cold War-era bunkers. But our burrowing roots go back to the very beginnings of animal life on earth. Without burrowing, our planet would be very different today. Many animal lineages alive now--including our own--only survived a cataclysmic meteorite strike 65 million years ago because they went underground. On a grander scale, burrows have changed the chemistry of the planet itself, with whole ecosystems being altered by these animals. Every day we walk on an earth filled with an underground wilderness teeming with life. Most of this life stays hidden, yet these animals and their subterranean homes are ubiquitous, ranging from the deep sea to mountains, from the equator to the poles. Burrows are a refuge from predators, a safe home for raising young, or a tool to ambush prey. Burrows have protected animals against all types of natural disasters, be it volcanic eruptions, meteors, or global warmings and coolings. In a book filled with with spectacularly diverse fauna, acclaimed paleontologist and ichnologist Anthony Martin reveals this fascinating, hidden world that will continue to influence and transform life on this planet."--Jacket.
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Nonfiction 560 MAR (Browse shelf) Available 2089100147807
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"February 2017"--Title page verso.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"What is the best way to survive when the going gets tough? From dinosaurs to penguins, from trilobites to humans, discover the marvelous subterranean secret to survival. Humans have "gone underground" for survival for thousands of years, whether in ancient underground cities or Cold War-era bunkers. But our burrowing roots go back to the very beginnings of animal life on earth. Without burrowing, our planet would be very different today. Many animal lineages alive now--including our own--only survived a cataclysmic meteorite strike 65 million years ago because they went underground. On a grander scale, burrows have changed the chemistry of the planet itself, with whole ecosystems being altered by these animals. Every day we walk on an earth filled with an underground wilderness teeming with life. Most of this life stays hidden, yet these animals and their subterranean homes are ubiquitous, ranging from the deep sea to mountains, from the equator to the poles. Burrows are a refuge from predators, a safe home for raising young, or a tool to ambush prey. Burrows have protected animals against all types of natural disasters, be it volcanic eruptions, meteors, or global warmings and coolings. In a book filled with with spectacularly diverse fauna, acclaimed paleontologist and ichnologist Anthony Martin reveals this fascinating, hidden world that will continue to influence and transform life on this planet."--Jacket.

The wondrous world of burrows -- Beyond "cavemen" : a brief history of humans underground -- Kaleidoscopes of dug-out diversity -- Hadean dinosaurs and birds underfoot -- Bomb shelters of the Phanerozoic -- Terraforming a planet, one hole at a time -- Playing hide and seek for keeps -- Rulers of the underworld -- Viva la evoluci�on : change comes from within -- Appendix: Genera and species mentioned in The evolution underground.

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The evolution underground : by Martin, Anthony J.,

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