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The missile next door : the Minuteman in the American heartland / Gretchen Heefner.

By: Heefner, Gretchen [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (294 pages, 18 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations, maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780674067462 (electronic bk.); 0674067460 (electronic bk.).Other title: Minuteman in the American heartland.Subject(s): Minuteman (Missile) | Intercontinental ballistic missile bases -- United States -- History | Cold War -- Social aspects -- West (U.S.) | West (U.S.) -- History, Military | Great Plains -- History, Military | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Military Science | HISTORY / United States / State & Local / West (AK, CA, CO, HI, ID, MT, NV, UT, WY)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Missile next door.DDC classification: 358.1/75482097309045 Online resources: ebrary | EBSCOhost | More online. | JSTOR | An electronic book accessible through the World Wide Web; click to view | Click here to view book Ebook Library
Contents:
Introduction : Q strange new landscape -- Ace in the hole -- Selling deterrence -- The mapmakers -- Cold War on the range -- Nuclear heartland -- The radical plains -- Dismantling the Cold War -- Conclusion: Missiles and memory.
Summary: Between 1961 and 1967 the United States Air Force buried 1,000 Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles in pastures across the Great Plains. The Missile Next Door tells the story of how rural Americans of all political stripes were drafted to fight the Cold War by living with nuclear missiles in their backyards--and what that story tells us about enduring political divides and the persistence of defense spending. By scattering the missiles in out-of-the-way places, the Defense Department kept the chilling calculus of Cold War nuclear strategy out of view. This subterfuge was necessary, Gretchen Heefner argues, in order for Americans to accept a costly nuclear buildup and the resulting threat of Armageddon. As for the ranchers, farmers, and other civilians in the Plains states who were first seduced by the economics of war and then forced to live in the Soviet crosshairs, their sense of citizenship was forever changed. Some were stirred to dissent. Others consented but found their proud Plains individualism giving way to a growing dependence on the military-industrial complex. Even today, some communities express reluctance to let the Minutemen go, though the Air Force no longer wants them buried in the heartland. Complicating a red state/blue state reading of American politics, Heefner's account helps to explain the deep distrust of government found in many western regions, and also an addiction to defense spending which, for many local economies, seems inescapable.
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Four-week, one renewal Four-week, one renewal Butte Public Library
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Nonfiction 358.17 HEE (Browse shelf) Available 2089100134375
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Between 1961 and 1967 the United States Air Force buried 1,000 Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles in pastures across the Great Plains. The Missile Next Door tells the story of how rural Americans of all political stripes were drafted to fight the Cold War by living with nuclear missiles in their backyards--and what that story tells us about enduring political divides and the persistence of defense spending. By scattering the missiles in out-of-the-way places, the Defense Department kept the chilling calculus of Cold War nuclear strategy out of view. This subterfuge was necessary, Gretchen Heefner argues, in order for Americans to accept a costly nuclear buildup and the resulting threat of Armageddon. As for the ranchers, farmers, and other civilians in the Plains states who were first seduced by the economics of war and then forced to live in the Soviet crosshairs, their sense of citizenship was forever changed. Some were stirred to dissent. Others consented but found their proud Plains individualism giving way to a growing dependence on the military-industrial complex. Even today, some communities express reluctance to let the Minutemen go, though the Air Force no longer wants them buried in the heartland. Complicating a red state/blue state reading of American politics, Heefner's account helps to explain the deep distrust of government found in many western regions, and also an addiction to defense spending which, for many local economies, seems inescapable.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : Q strange new landscape -- Ace in the hole -- Selling deterrence -- The mapmakers -- Cold War on the range -- Nuclear heartland -- The radical plains -- Dismantling the Cold War -- Conclusion: Missiles and memory.

Description based on print version record.

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